Tag Archives: writing conferences

How to Persevere and Succeed

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I’ve been writing since Spring of the year 2000.

The first seven years of writing were such fun. I wasn’t involved in any writing groups, I wasn’t trying to get anything published, and I didn’t feel any push to carry my writing to a higher level. Writing was an avocation when my vocation was teaching music.

I wrote for the sheer joy of putting stories, which had been clamoring to be expressed, on paper, and discovering that characters develop minds of their own, and lead me in mysterious and delightful directions.

In 2007 I finished my first novel. Flushed with the feeling of victory that comes from this achievement, I immediately registered for a writing conference. (I heard that’s what one does in order to meet agents and editors.)

 

I met with several agents, and one expressed interest in seeing some of my writing.

I thought, this is easy. I write a book, find an agent, get a contract, then the agent will quickly find representation, maybe with Harper Collins or Random House, etc. Within a few years I’ll be another successful and well-known author. My books will immediately sell well. I’ll have no trouble selling subsequent books. Marketing? What’s that?

At the conference, I heard lots of talk about platform, whatever that was. Uh, maybe that’s just for non-fiction writers.

Nope, that’s you, too, you ignorant fiction writer.

The nice agent eventually rejected my novel proposal. Surprise.

That’s painful. It’s like walking into a an invisible wall. Maybe that’s where we get the expression: you nose gets out of joint. I wanted to yell, or something:

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I kept praying. And writing.

Wake up call for me. Just writing a book does not guarantee immediate success.

Join a writer’s group, or two, I was advised.  I joined three, just to be safe.

Each week I drove 100 miles from Estes Park, Colorado to Highlands Ranch, Colorado. Made some writing friends, listened to lectures on the craft of writing, practiced.

Two years later, I submitted an article to a Christian publisher. And got published!

I kept praying and studying God’s Word so my own words would pour out helpful and inspiring stories. And kept writing.

Feeling more confident, I attended another, bigger writer conference in Denver. Rejected again. I have to say that, though agents and editors are busy—and I understand the frantic pace of their work—they barely listened to my pitch.

I went home and finished writing book number two. Submitted more articles and got lots of them published. I found another writing group and met wonderful people like Amanda Cabot, Jane Choate, Audra Harders, Leslie Ann Sartor: all great writers.

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I kept praying and studying, and serving in church. And writing. You can’t stop.

I also started entering writing contests. Little by little, over about a five-year period, my entries started doing very well. My scores went up and up.

I published more short stories and articles. Found an agent. Almost got my first book published, but at the last moment, the publishing board voted to reject my manuscript.

Back home, I parted ways with my lovely agent and struck out to independently seek publication for my now three-book series.

By now, I’d been in several critique groups, had written, re-written, edited, re-edited my books at least ten times. I still have several old versions on my computer. (It’s kind of bittersweet to read some of my earlier attempts.)

One day, I checked my email and noticed that Anaiah Press had contacted me. “We like your book and would like to publish it.”

Unfortunately, I was sitting in the food court of my local mall drinking a Starbucks Americano so I couldn’t  jump up and do the Snoopy dance. Well, I could’ve if I didn’t want about a hundred women to steer clear of me, glancing sidewards, clutching their purses close to their chests, muttering to their children, “stay away from that funny old woman.”

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Little did I know that the next six months were going to be intense with edits, re-writes, emails back and forth between the editor and me.

A month later, Write integrity Press offered me a three-book contract on my suspense series, The Hunted. More intense and long hours.

FRONT Havens Flight

Then, the books released on Amazon, within a few weeks of each other. I thought I’d lose my mind, what with all the marketing activity, combined with all the volunteer things I do in the community and my church.

I remember someone—a published author— telling me, “Once you get published, your time will never again be your own.” At the time, I kind of sniffed at her words. Easy for her to say. She’s published. She can’t relate. She’s forgotten the angst and frustration of trying to get your first book contract.

But, you know, that writer was absolutely right.

My fourth book will release in the beginning of 2019. And I’ve got another one just about ready to be submitted. And I’m working on two other manuscripts, as well.

Back story: Near the end of 2015, I had sat down before God and said, “Lord, I’m just about all in with this trying-to-get-published thing. If I don’t get a contract within a year, I’ll know you’re telling me to hang up my skates. I want to do only those things that are pleasing to you and are building up your kingdom. So please don’t let me waste time if it’s not going to happen.”

Six months later I landed my first full-length book contract. God is funny, that’s all I can say.

And now a few words on perseverance—the Christian way, that is:

As you’re doing the thing you hope to succeed in—it doesn’t have to be writing. Good grief, it could be learning a language, or trying to be an astronaut—here are some God-things to be doing simultaneously:

  1. Read and meditate on God’s Word. Every day.
  2. Pray for wisdom and understanding.
  3. Mindfully connect your daily trials—and your joys— to the truth of God’s Word.
  4. Now that you know what the Word of God says, practice obeying it.
  5. Make a daily habit of praising and worshiping the Lord.

These activities are not some magical way to manipulate God into doing things your way. Instead, this is the way to grow in seeing your life the way God sees it, and growing in your desire to bring Him honor.

I wish you God’s best. His ways are higher and better than our ways. Commit your way to the Lord.

God bless you as you persevere in working—yes, it is work— toward your goal.

Col. 3:17 “And whatever you do, whether in word or deed, do it all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through Him.” (NIV Version)

I Didn’t Give Up

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I’m so excited about my publishing contract with Anaiah Press. Since signing the contract a few days ago, I’ve been thinking about the years that led up to this happy event.

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I started writing in the year 2000.

But I didn’t write seriously until 2007. That was the year of my first big writer’s conference.

It’s where I learned that writing a novel is different from writing a good non-fiction article, or biography, or whatever.

It’s different, my professional critiquers at the conference told me. Instructors helped me understand what I needed to do to become a novelist.

I joined writer’s groups, critique groups, went to writing seminars, studied books on writing, practiced, got more small items published. (If you’re curious, see my “books” page.)

In 2009 I attended my first American Christian Fiction Writers annual conference. That year it was in Denver, a town only fifty miles away from my Estes Park home.

I didn’t know more than a handful of people at the conference, so I determined to make the most of  meal times in the packed hall by sitting at different tables. I brought along a small note pad and, over coffee and dessert, asked each of the writers at the table about their publishing journey and what advice they could offer me.

The most valuable piece of advice came from an older woman who had recently published three novels. She said:

“The only reason I’m published and the rest of my critique members are not is that I didn’t give up.”

I didn’t give up. That phrase has since become my mantra. I’m sure every novelist can relate.

We conceive and gestate and birth our “babies,” while sequestered in spaces carved out for the creation process, trying to ignore the urgent calls of our lazy nature to “write tomorrow.” We research, type and delete, edit and re-edit, get critiqued, talk to agents and editors.

We finally hit “send.” Then we wait and wait and wait.

Most of the time, we hear nothing. Our hearts die a little with each rejection. But if we remember, “I didn’t give up,” we square our jaws and jump back into the quest for a publisher.

I’m Going To Give Up

This was absolutely, positively going to be the last year of my writing career, I told the Lord. There are so many other good things I could be doing with my time. “Dear Jesus, please guide me. Let me know whether I should continue, or give up writing.”

And then Anaiah Press invited me to sign a contract for one of my novels.

Praise the Lord! Thank You, Jesus!

Thank You, Jesus, that You let me have that little God-appointment with the writer at the ACFW conference.

“I didn’t give up,” she said.

I’ve got four other novels, ready, waiting in the wings, and more “babies” to birth later this year.

I won’t give up on them, either.